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Eagle Kachina by Henry Naha
List Price: $525.00
Our Price: $350.00

Eagle Kachina by Henry Naha is 7" total height including 1/2" base and 8 1/2" wingspan.


This dance is not as common as it might have been at one time, and according to Barton Wright's Kachinas: a Hopi Artist's Documentary, you might have the satisfaction of occasionally seeing a performance "in one of the night ceremonies in March or during the Powamu."
"Usually the personator imitates the step or motion and cry of the eagle to absolute perfection. There is evidence that this kachina was imported into Zuni from the Hopi and is danced there in much the same manner that it is at Hopi.
This may be why the Eagle may appear during Pamuya on First Mesa with Zuni Kachinas." (87)





Well-known Hopi artist Henry Naha carved this fine Kachina. Henry, an outstanding, well-respected carver who is a member of the Spider and Lizard Clans, lives near Polacca, Arizona.
He was taught by one of the masters - Cecil Calnimptewa, who is his Hopi godfather; and was the husband of Avonne Naha, also a talented carver.
He has been an active carver for over 20 years and learned from others such as Denis Tewa and Joseph Dallas.
His figures always have an excellent stance and pose suggesting great strength and pride. The body proportions are in balance and the kachina has well defined musculature. The hands are extremely well carved with detailed fingers and fingernails.
He has signed the bottom of the base: "H. Naha" along with a symbolic lizard, which is his Clan symbol.
Turkey Kachina by Coolidge Roy Jr.
List Price: $690.00
Our Price: $450.00

Turkey Kachina by Coolidge Roy Jr.  6 1/2" total height including 7/8" base


"The Turkey Kachina appears with other birds in the kivas at night or during the Mixed Dances of late spring. He is not a common kachina and seems to be only from First Mesa."
- Barton Wright, Kachinas: a Hopi Artist's Documentary (104)


Coolidge Roy Jr. and his wife Juanita live on Third Mesa in Oraibi, Arizona. Coolidge has long been famous for his magnificently beautiful Eagle Dancer Kachina dolls.
Coolidge's father was a carver, too, as are his brothers and sons. Theda Bassman and Erik Bromberg’s The Hopi Approach to the Art of Kachina Doll Carving can find other fine examples of Coolidge’s work in most books on Hopi art including Hopi Kachina Dolls and their carvers.
He was born on August 4, 1950 and has been carving for well over 30 years. His work is well known and can be recognized easily because of his unique style. One of the most noticeable aspects of his carvings is the "natural" coloration that he achieves by using only very faint pigments.
He likens his expertise unto a professor or doctor who has spent their whole life learning their profession, and it shows in his work.
Coolidge has a lot of respect for his tradition and is extremely sensitive to it. He will not carve certain figure that "the elders" have warned against - concerned that it might bring misfortune to a friend or family member.
"Most of the time, when I am carving," he said, "I sing a song, a special song for each carving. The songs that I sing are the songs the Kachinas dance to. It's their song."
He also has a tradition of gathering up his shavings and taking them to a special place where he leaves them and lets the wind carry them away.
Eagle Kachina by Coolidge Roy Jr.
List Price: $690.00
Our Price: $450.00

Eagle Kachina by Coolidge Roy Jr.  6 1/2" total height including 7/8" base.


This dance is not as common as it might have been at one time, and according to Barton Wright's Kachinas: a Hopi Artist's Documentary, you might have the satisfaction of occasionally seeing a performance "in one of the night ceremonies in March or during the Powamu."
"Usually the personator imitates the step or motion and cry of the eagle to absolute perfection. There is evidence that this kachina was imported into Zuni from the Hopi and is danced there in much the same manner that it is at Hopi.
This may be why the Eagle may appear during Pamuya on First Mesa with Zuni Kachinas." (87)



Coolidge Roy Jr. and his wife Juanita live on Third Mesa in Oraibi, Arizona. Coolidge has long been famous for his magnificently beautiful Eagle Dancer Kachina dolls.
Coolidge's father was a carver, too, as are his brothers and sons. Theda Bassman and Erik Bromberg’s The Hopi Approach to the Art of Kachina Doll Carving can find other fine examples of Coolidge’s work in most books on Hopi art including Hopi Kachina Dolls and their carvers.
He was born on August 4, 1950 and has been carving for well over 30 years. His work is well known and can be recognized easily because of his unique style. One of the most noticeable aspects of his carvings is the "natural" coloration that he achieves by using only very faint pigments.
He likens his expertise unto a professor or doctor who has spent their whole life learning their profession, and it shows in his work.
Coolidge has a lot of respect for his tradition and is extremely sensitive to it. He will not carve certain figure that "the elders" have warned against - concerned that it might bring misfortune to a friend or family member.
"Most of the time, when I am carving," he said, "I sing a song, a special song for each carving. The songs that I sing are the songs the Kachinas dance to. It's their song."
He also has a tradition of gathering up his shavings and taking them to a special place where he leaves them and lets the wind carry them away.
Warrior Mouse by Neil David Sr.
List Price: $750.00
Our Price: $500.00

Warrior Mouse Kachina by Neil David Sr.  8 1/2" total height including 1/2" base



Born in 1944 on First Mesa in the village of Hano, Arizona, Neil David Sr. - a Hopi/Tewa - was carving kachina dolls before he was ten years old.
During his high school years his paintings and sketches were sold through Byron Hunter who managed McGee's store in Polacca, Arizona.
Neil's paintings and kachina carvings can be found in private collections and museums throughout the world. The set of 79 original paintings by Neil published in his book: Kachinas: Spirit Beings of the Hopi have been acquired by the Kashiwagi Museum in Tateshina, Nagano, Japan.
Neil entered the army and served in Germany during the Vietnam War. He resides in Polacca, Arizona on the Hopi Indian Reservation and continues to paint and carve. He sells his paintings and kachina dolls through art galleries and direct commissions from collectors.
Neil's artistic talents and creativity have brought him international recognition. His humor is conveyed through the expressions and antics of his Clown figures. His dedication and commitment to his heritage is seen in his paintings and carvings.
Neil's co-mingling of art and dedication to his culture gives a rare opportunity to view elements of Hopi life without intruding on the society. His insight, perception, and ability to capture on canvas, the personalities and actions of performers and spectators during the Hopi festivities have brought him wide acclaim and support for calling him "the Hopis' Norman Rockwell."
Jerry Jacka, Treasures of the Hopi by Theda Bassman, and Art of Kachina Doll Carving by E. Bromberg feature Neil’s work in over a dozen books and periodicals including Art of the Hopi.
The always mischievous and sometimes gluttonous Koshare are perfect satire of normal village life. Neil's Koshare are unique in that each has his own distinct characteristics - and personality. Their facial features, posture, and body movements tell us so much about the attitude of life in the Hopi plaza.
Neil's work is widely recognized due to the highly exaggerated features of his figures. Oversized ears, nose, and lips usually feature prominently.
Mother Earth Father Sky Pottery by Ida Sahmie
List Price: $1,000.00
Our Price: $600.00

3 3/4" high, 4" wide.


Ida Sahmie (Navajo) the wife of Andrew Sahmie (Hopi), and the daughter-in-law of Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo. She was born in 1960 and has been an active potter since 1990.
Her favorite designs are Yei-like figures. Gregory Schaff has described her in Hopi-Tewa Pottery: 500 Artists Biographies:
"Ida Sahmie is a Navajo woman who is married into a Tewa family. She has learned how to make pots in the technique and style of Hopi-Tewa potters. However, she prefers to use Navajo designs, especially Navajo Yeis, spiritual 'Holy People.'"
Along with her appearance in Hopi-Tewa Pottery: 500 Artists Biographies by Gregory Schaff (p. 143), Ida is also featured in Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery (p. 48), and in The Legacy of a Master Potter: Nampeyo and Her Descendants by Mary Ellen and Laurence Blair (p. 188).
Although her work has drawn criticism from both the Hopi-Tewa and Navajo communities, Ida maintains her commitment to her artwork and continues to push forward with clean and consistent pieces.
Ida is quoted in Fourteen Families: " Personally, I feel I have a unique talent with pottery. It's a combination of both Hopi and Navajo, though I feel it should be more Navajo because I am a Navajo. I want to stick with more Navajo designs. The Yei figures are the most popular for me, secondly would be the rug designs, and third the sand painting designs."
Four Sacred Mountains Navajo Life Pottery by Ida Sahmie
List Price: $1,000.00
Our Price: $600.00

3 1/4" high, 4" wide.


Ida Sahmie (Navajo) the wife of Andrew Sahmie (Hopi), and the daughter-in-law of Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo. She was born in 1960 and has been an active potter since 1990.
Her favorite designs are Yei-like figures. Gregory Schaff has described her in Hopi-Tewa Pottery: 500 Artists Biographies:
"Ida Sahmie is a Navajo woman who is married into a Tewa family. She has learned how to make pots in the technique and style of Hopi-Tewa potters. However, she prefers to use Navajo designs, especially Navajo Yeis, spiritual 'Holy People.'"
Along with her appearance in Hopi-Tewa Pottery: 500 Artists Biographies by Gregory Schaff (p. 143), Ida is also featured in Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery (p. 48), and in The Legacy of a Master Potter: Nampeyo and Her Descendants by Mary Ellen and Laurence Blair (p. 188).
Although her work has drawn criticism from both the Hopi-Tewa and Navajo communities, Ida maintains her commitment to her artwork and continues to push forward with clean and consistent pieces.
Ida is quoted in Fourteen Families: " Personally, I feel I have a unique talent with pottery. It's a combination of both Hopi and Navajo, though I feel it should be more Navajo because I am a Navajo. I want to stick with more Navajo designs. The Yei figures are the most popular for me, secondly would be the rug designs, and third the sand painting designs."
Night Sky Pottery by Ida Sahmie
List Price: $1,050.00
Our Price: $625.00

3" high, 3 1/2" wide.


Ida Sahmie (Navajo) the wife of Andrew Sahmie (Hopi), and the daughter-in-law of Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo. She was born in 1960 and has been an active potter since 1990.
Her favorite designs are Yei-like figures. Gregory Schaff has described her in Hopi-Tewa Pottery: 500 Artists Biographies:
"Ida Sahmie is a Navajo woman who is married into a Tewa family. She has learned how to make pots in the technique and style of Hopi-Tewa potters. However, she prefers to use Navajo designs, especially Navajo Yeis, spiritual 'Holy People.'"
Along with her appearance in Hopi-Tewa Pottery: 500 Artists Biographies by Gregory Schaff (p. 143), Ida is also featured in Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery (p. 48), and in The Legacy of a Master Potter: Nampeyo and Her Descendants by Mary Ellen and Laurence Blair (p. 188).
Although her work has drawn criticism from both the Hopi-Tewa and Navajo communities, Ida maintains her commitment to her artwork and continues to push forward with clean and consistent pieces.
Ida is quoted in Fourteen Families: " Personally, I feel I have a unique talent with pottery. It's a combination of both Hopi and Navajo, though I feel it should be more Navajo because I am a Navajo. I want to stick with more Navajo designs. The Yei figures are the most popular for me, secondly would be the rug designs, and third the sand painting designs."