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Ho'e by Eugene Dallas
Our Price: $300.00

Ho'e by Eugene Dallas  is 10 1/2 inches tall with a 1 3/4 inch base.


The Ho'e figure is a figure who appears during the Powamu ceremony (or Bean Dance) and is part of the procession which proceeds around the village. They are known for being noisy and boisterous teases. They are constantly disrupting the procession and the other kachinas with their games and antics.
Constantly, the guardian kachinas are returning to the plaza to be sure that the Ho'e are keeping up with the pack. Finally, they are the last to give up their games and go into the kiva.



Eugene began carving kachinas full-time as an adult. He has developed a distinctive style that features rich colors and shading on his figures.
His attention to detail is shown not only in his exquisite carving, but also in the costume and accouterments of the kachina. He has said that the Kachinas reflect his Hopi heritage in two ways; first from the way that they appear and also with their associated meanings.
Eugene feels that the Hopi people are an intrinsically artistic culture. He typically signs his kachinas on the bottom with crossed feathered arrows. Eugene has a large extended family of carvers, including his brothers Leon and Reginald Dallas.
Eagle Kachina by Henry Naha
List Price: $525.00
Our Price: $350.00

Eagle Kachina by Henry Naha is 7" total height including 1/2" base and 8 1/2" wingspan.


This dance is not as common as it might have been at one time, and according to Barton Wright's Kachinas: a Hopi Artist's Documentary, you might have the satisfaction of occasionally seeing a performance "in one of the night ceremonies in March or during the Powamu."
"Usually the personator imitates the step or motion and cry of the eagle to absolute perfection. There is evidence that this kachina was imported into Zuni from the Hopi and is danced there in much the same manner that it is at Hopi.
This may be why the Eagle may appear during Pamuya on First Mesa with Zuni Kachinas." (87)





Well-known Hopi artist Henry Naha carved this fine Kachina. Henry, an outstanding, well-respected carver who is a member of the Spider and Lizard Clans, lives near Polacca, Arizona.
He was taught by one of the masters - Cecil Calnimptewa, who is his Hopi godfather; and was the husband of Avonne Naha, also a talented carver.
He has been an active carver for over 20 years and learned from others such as Denis Tewa and Joseph Dallas.
His figures always have an excellent stance and pose suggesting great strength and pride. The body proportions are in balance and the kachina has well defined musculature. The hands are extremely well carved with detailed fingers and fingernails.
He has signed the bottom of the base: "H. Naha" along with a symbolic lizard, which is his Clan symbol.
Turkey Kachina by Coolidge Roy Jr.
List Price: $690.00
Our Price: $450.00

Turkey Kachina by Coolidge Roy Jr.  6 1/2" total height including 7/8" base


"The Turkey Kachina appears with other birds in the kivas at night or during the Mixed Dances of late spring. He is not a common kachina and seems to be only from First Mesa."
- Barton Wright, Kachinas: a Hopi Artist's Documentary (104)


Coolidge Roy Jr. and his wife Juanita live on Third Mesa in Oraibi, Arizona. Coolidge has long been famous for his magnificently beautiful Eagle Dancer Kachina dolls.
Coolidge's father was a carver, too, as are his brothers and sons. Theda Bassman and Erik Bromberg’s The Hopi Approach to the Art of Kachina Doll Carving can find other fine examples of Coolidge’s work in most books on Hopi art including Hopi Kachina Dolls and their carvers.
He was born on August 4, 1950 and has been carving for well over 30 years. His work is well known and can be recognized easily because of his unique style. One of the most noticeable aspects of his carvings is the "natural" coloration that he achieves by using only very faint pigments.
He likens his expertise unto a professor or doctor who has spent their whole life learning their profession, and it shows in his work.
Coolidge has a lot of respect for his tradition and is extremely sensitive to it. He will not carve certain figure that "the elders" have warned against - concerned that it might bring misfortune to a friend or family member.
"Most of the time, when I am carving," he said, "I sing a song, a special song for each carving. The songs that I sing are the songs the Kachinas dance to. It's their song."
He also has a tradition of gathering up his shavings and taking them to a special place where he leaves them and lets the wind carry them away.
Eagle Kachina by Coolidge Roy Jr.
List Price: $690.00
Our Price: $450.00

Eagle Kachina by Coolidge Roy Jr.  6 1/2" total height including 7/8" base.


This dance is not as common as it might have been at one time, and according to Barton Wright's Kachinas: a Hopi Artist's Documentary, you might have the satisfaction of occasionally seeing a performance "in one of the night ceremonies in March or during the Powamu."
"Usually the personator imitates the step or motion and cry of the eagle to absolute perfection. There is evidence that this kachina was imported into Zuni from the Hopi and is danced there in much the same manner that it is at Hopi.
This may be why the Eagle may appear during Pamuya on First Mesa with Zuni Kachinas." (87)



Coolidge Roy Jr. and his wife Juanita live on Third Mesa in Oraibi, Arizona. Coolidge has long been famous for his magnificently beautiful Eagle Dancer Kachina dolls.
Coolidge's father was a carver, too, as are his brothers and sons. Theda Bassman and Erik Bromberg’s The Hopi Approach to the Art of Kachina Doll Carving can find other fine examples of Coolidge’s work in most books on Hopi art including Hopi Kachina Dolls and their carvers.
He was born on August 4, 1950 and has been carving for well over 30 years. His work is well known and can be recognized easily because of his unique style. One of the most noticeable aspects of his carvings is the "natural" coloration that he achieves by using only very faint pigments.
He likens his expertise unto a professor or doctor who has spent their whole life learning their profession, and it shows in his work.
Coolidge has a lot of respect for his tradition and is extremely sensitive to it. He will not carve certain figure that "the elders" have warned against - concerned that it might bring misfortune to a friend or family member.
"Most of the time, when I am carving," he said, "I sing a song, a special song for each carving. The songs that I sing are the songs the Kachinas dance to. It's their song."
He also has a tradition of gathering up his shavings and taking them to a special place where he leaves them and lets the wind carry them away.
Warrior Mouse by Neil David Sr.
List Price: $750.00
Our Price: $500.00

Warrior Mouse Kachina by Neil David Sr.  8 1/2" total height including 1/2" base



Born in 1944 on First Mesa in the village of Hano, Arizona, Neil David Sr. - a Hopi/Tewa - was carving kachina dolls before he was ten years old.
During his high school years his paintings and sketches were sold through Byron Hunter who managed McGee's store in Polacca, Arizona.
Neil's paintings and kachina carvings can be found in private collections and museums throughout the world. The set of 79 original paintings by Neil published in his book: Kachinas: Spirit Beings of the Hopi have been acquired by the Kashiwagi Museum in Tateshina, Nagano, Japan.
Neil entered the army and served in Germany during the Vietnam War. He resides in Polacca, Arizona on the Hopi Indian Reservation and continues to paint and carve. He sells his paintings and kachina dolls through art galleries and direct commissions from collectors.
Neil's artistic talents and creativity have brought him international recognition. His humor is conveyed through the expressions and antics of his Clown figures. His dedication and commitment to his heritage is seen in his paintings and carvings.
Neil's co-mingling of art and dedication to his culture gives a rare opportunity to view elements of Hopi life without intruding on the society. His insight, perception, and ability to capture on canvas, the personalities and actions of performers and spectators during the Hopi festivities have brought him wide acclaim and support for calling him "the Hopis' Norman Rockwell."
Jerry Jacka, Treasures of the Hopi by Theda Bassman, and Art of Kachina Doll Carving by E. Bromberg feature Neil’s work in over a dozen books and periodicals including Art of the Hopi.
The always mischievous and sometimes gluttonous Koshare are perfect satire of normal village life. Neil's Koshare are unique in that each has his own distinct characteristics - and personality. Their facial features, posture, and body movements tell us so much about the attitude of life in the Hopi plaza.
Neil's work is widely recognized due to the highly exaggerated features of his figures. Oversized ears, nose, and lips usually feature prominently.
Prong Horn by Malcolm Fred
Our Price: $900.00

Prong Horn by Malcolm Fred is a total of 13 inches tall. Like most of the other game animals, this Antelope / Pronghorn, or Chof, kachina dances for the increase of his kind. "When he appears, whether in the kiva or as a group in the plaza, it is in the hope that more of his kind will be around for harvesting by the Hopis. The Hopis may offer him cornmeal and prayer feathers and explicity state the wish that he will remain and allow them to take some members of the Antelope family. The stick that he holds in his hands represent the front legs of the animal when he walks or dances." - Barton Wright, Kachinas: a Hopi Artist's Documentary (165) Malcolm comes from a large family of Kachina carvers which include brothers Jim, Verlan, Henry, Nathan and Glen. He has been carving and winning awards since he was a teenager. His awards include a Zuni Fire God which he entered into the 1996 Arizona State Fair. He is married to and has 3 children with a Zuni lady. One of his favorite kachinas is the whipper which he seems to do most frequently. Malcolm is of the Greasewood and Roadrunner clans, and was raised in the village of Bacavi. He has been carving for 25 years. His motivation comes from his religion, history, and the freedom of expressing his inner feelings. Malcolm continues to achieve incredible realism in his figures, and is known for his large and well-proportioned figures.



(This item is listed at net price.)
Kasaile Clown by Lowell Talashoma
Our Price: $1,200.00

Kasaile Clown Kachina by Lowell Talashoma is a total of 15 3/4 inches tall total. Lowell Talashoma was born January 23, 1950 in the village of Moencopi, Arizona at the western edge of the Hopi reservation. He spent many of his childhood years in Salt Lake City, Utah, with a Mormon foster family. In spite of his separation from the Hopi influence, his talent for carving came through as he began carving different animals from wood at the age of 6 as a Cub Scout. Upon his return to Hopi at about the age of 10 he began carving kachina dolls and has been doing so now for almost 40 years. After Lowell's return to Hopi he spent many years trying to reconcile the Mormon and Hopi religions. He now feels the two flow together well for him. As a result, Lowell is a very spiritual man. Lowell states, "I try to carve the dolls the way the Kachinas are in the dances. I look at them the way they walk, the way they stand and how they give the gifts." Lowell's emphasis is on the surface treatment of the wood, creating a multitude of various textures that give a very realistic appearance. Lowell has also done carvings in bronze and is an accomplished painter too Lowell's figures portray the human body in full action and in anotomic proportion. Lowell is featured in most every book on Kachinas. He is featured in Hopi Kachina Dolls and Their Carvers by Theda Bassman on pages 150-154 and in The Art of the Hopi by Lois and Jerry Jacka on page 79. Lowell's work is also shown in Erik Bromberg's Kachina Doll Carving on pages 26,27 and 30. In Helga Tiewes book, Kachina Dolls, Lowell is featured on pages 117-119. The Kachina is signed on the bottom of the base: "Lowell Talashoma, Sr."


(This item is listed at net price.)
Blessing from Above by Jon Cordero
Our Price: $1,200.00

Blessing From Above by Jon Cordero is a total of 15 1/2 inches tall. "The Hano Mana is given to the girls of Tewa in much the same manner that Hahai-i Wuhti is given the Hopi girls by the men of their villages. Even among the Hopis it is very often a favorite for the first or second gift to the children "She appears in the Bean Dance on Second Mesa and in the Water Serpent Ceremony on First Mesa. Usually if this kachina wears the embroidered wedding robe, it is turned inside out. More often she appearsin the maiden shawl. The hair is normally put up in Tewa-style knots on either side of the head rather than as it is shown here. Spruce is held in each hand with the corn." - Barton Wright, Hopi Kachinas: a Hopi Artist Documentary (51) Born June 16, 1968 to the village of Moenkopi, Arizona, Jon is the son of a Hopi mother, and a Cochiti father who died when Jon was just a baby. Although Jon was raised on the Hopi Reservation, he would always spend a month each summer with his Cochiti grandmother, the famed matriarch of storytellers, Helen Cordero. His grandmother tried to teach him to make storytellers, but it just wasn't his calling. Instead, when he was in high school, he learned to carve Kachina dolls from his uncles, Hopi master carvers Loren Phillips and Tom Holmes. And Loren was not only his teacher but also continued to encourage Jon in his carving through the years. Like the traditional Hopi Jon continually strives to be, he works very hard all the time tending to his cattle and his horse as well as planting and tending his crops of corn, beans, melons and squash. And he participates in the dances, in respect to the Kachinas. Yet Jon always finds time to do what he likes best, and that is to carve. Instead of carving alone, Jon prefers the company of other carvers. His favorite carving buddy has always been his cousin and clan brother Leonard Selestewa, who was also always a great source of encouragement for Jon. Among the many books on Hopi Kachinas that mention Jon and his work is Theda Bassman's Hopi Kachina Dolls and their carvers. Jon says he is serious about his carving and wants to carve for the rest of his life. Whenever he finishes a carving he hopes it will find a good home, and whoever buys it will admire it for the rest of their lives. Jon has become well-known for his beautiful, realistic Kachina doll carvings and his work has become highly sought after.


(This item is listed at net price.)